Write descriptive essay about The Good, the Bad and the Ugly movie 1966, write an essay of at least 500 words on The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, 5 paragraph essay on The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, definition essay, descriptive essay, dichotomy essay.
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Year:
1966
Country:
USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Western
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Sergio Leone
Eli Wallach as Tuco
Lee Van Cleef as Sentenza
Aldo Giuffrè as Alcoholic Union Captain
Luigi Pistilli as Father Pablo Ramirez
Enzo Petito as Storekeeper
Claudio Scarchilli as Mexican peon
John Bartha as Sheriff (as John Bartho)
Antonio Casale as Jackson / Bill Carson
Sandro Scarchilli as Mexican peon
Benito Stefanelli as Member of Angel Eyes' Gang
Angelo Novi as Monk
Storyline: Blondie (The Good) is a professional gunslinger who is out trying to earn a few dollars. Angel Eyes (The Bad) is a hit man who always commits to a task and sees it through, as long as he is paid to do so. And Tuco (The Ugly) is a wanted outlaw trying to take care of his own hide. Tuco and Blondie share a partnership together making money off Tuco's bounty, but when Blondie unties the partnership, Tuco tries to hunt down Blondie. When Blondie and Tuco come across a horse carriage loaded with dead bodies, they soon learn from the only survivor (Bill Carson) that he and a few other men have buried a stash of gold in a cemetery. Unfortunately Carson dies and Tuco only finds out the name of the cemetery, while Blondie finds out the name on the grave. Now the two must keep each other alive in order to find the gold. Angel Eyes (who had been looking for Bill Carson) discovers that Tuco and Blondie met with Carson and knows they know the location of the gold. All he needs is for the two to ...
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x816 px 13374 Mb h264 1536 Kbps mkv Download
HQ DVD-rip 720x480 px 2092 Mb mpeg4 1637 Kbps avi Download
Reviews
The Blood of Human Kindness
Eight of Ten Stars. I was so enamored of this movie as a teen that my Northwestern University freshman dorm wall was papered with big B&W posters of mssrs. Eastwood, Wallach and Van Cleef in the Fall of 1968. I was quite the little existentialist then; "If it feels good, DO IT!" was the mantra of my high school Senior English teacher. Well, it felt good, and bad, and ugly. I ended up dropping out of Northwestern after Kent State and, taking the soundtrack of GBU (in my head) with me to Vietnam in 1971, I proceeded to get a real-world education in the old 'ultra-violence' as an infantryman in the AMERICAL Division... WHAT you may ask does this have to do with an American Civil War movie, directed and written by an Italian Communist? (Sergio Leone's daddy may have been more of a commie than Sergio was, but the fact is that "A Fistful of Dollars" was STOLEN from Kurosawa, while "The Magnificent Seven" was PURCHASED years before. The end justifies the means? Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery?) http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/classic/articles/prof.html I found out firsthand the moral ambiguities of war. If only I had paid attention to the subtext in GBU! If only I had studied the Matthew Henry battlefield dead tintypes as Leone so obviously had! His hideous, rotting carcases of Union and Confederate soldiers, bloating in direct sunlight, would have sufficiently revulsed me from any notion that I could 'play soldier' and survive! But here I am, having just barely survived.... and I just got out of the fabulous Fox Theater here in Atlanta where the restored GBU was projected in all its Technicolor/Technirama glory at fully loaded, screaming Morricone volume.... there must have been at least a thousand people there, and hardly anyone moved. INCREDIBLE. It is said that the movie was made to the tunes Morricone made prior to production's start; i.e. Leone played the music while shooting the scenes! Hence, these epics are giant music videos - fantasias - symphonic cinema- they are huge, elegiac tone poems! And, God help me, I still love this movie.
2006-07-17
the greatest western ever
The beautiful cinematography , the excellent music and great camera work make this a stylish masterpiece. With a volatile mix of myth and realism The Good The Bad And The Ugly is the best of the spaghetti westerns and the greatest western ever made.This is Clint Eastwood's 2nd best movie (the best is UNFORGIVEN) Elli Wallach was excellent as Tuco, he is the real star of the movie, he had the best lines . Lee Van Cleef plays the bad guy to perfection.Sergio Leone is at his very best here.And Ennio Morricone's music is outstanding like always. The man with no name will always be the best. Buy it and experience the spectacle and greatness of a western like no other.
2007-08-22
Hands down, the best Spaghetti Western movie ever! "When you have to shoot, shoot! Don't talk." Sergio Leone knows how to shoot a Spaghetti Western.
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is just amazing to watch. I'm watching the 2004 extended version, with all the delete scenes in it. Directed by Sergio Leone, this movie is the third film in the Dollars Trilogy following 1964's A Fistful of Dollars and 1965's For a Few Dollars More, serving as a prequel to them. Thank Goodness, the movie wasn't call 'The Two Magnificent Tramps', its working title. In the United States, United Artists considered using the original Italian translation, River of Dollars, or The Man with No Name, but decided on The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. The title, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly suite the plot so well. The plot revolves around three gunslingers, 'the Good' AKA 'Brodie' AKA 'The Man with no name (Clint Eastwood), 'The Bad' AKA 'Angel Eyes' (Lee Van Cleef) and 'The Ugly" Mexican bandit Tuco Ramirez (Eli Wallach). All three are competing to find a fortune in buried Confederate gold during the American Civil War. All the actors in this film are great. Clint Eastwood is great. I love that the producers finally explain where his character got his trademark poncho. Granted, the other two were morally worse than him, but Blondie's not exactly a nice guy, too. It's more like 'the good enough'. I love, how Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach work with each other. Lots of chemistry there, yet a lot of backstabbing triathlon with the trio. Tuco is the only one of the trio, the audience really gets to know all about. We meet his brother and find out where he came from and why he became a bandit. The other two are more of a mysteries. The names "Blondie" and "Angel Eyes" aren't exactly threatening, but workable. Blondie's hair is sandy brown. This is due to imperfect translation from the original Italian. Mad props to Eli Wallach for doing all the dangerous stunts as he almost got killed in real life like three times during the making of this movie. Eli Wallach pretty much steals the movie with his character. Originally, Leone wanted Charles Bronson to play Angel Eyes but he was already committed to another movie, and Leone choose Lee Van Cleef as the villain, playing opposite to the character, he plays in the 'For a Few Dollars More'. I glad, Lee Van Cleef was chosen for the film. He was best as the villain. Still, it does get kinda confusing, story wise seeing how the films are supposedly connect to each other. In the theatrical trailer, Angel Eyes is referred to as The Ugly and Tuco as The Bad. This is due to a translation error; the original Italian title translates literally to "The Good, the Ugly, the Bad". Still, the Good, the Bad and the Ugly had tons of memorable lines, funny scenes, and epic action, but the movie is really long. It takes forever to get to the buried treasure part of the movie, even if you watching a way cut down version. Angel Eyes besides the opening, doesn't show up, until half way to the film. Lots of desert scenes that they add in the 2004 version was cut out for a good reason. The movie takes a lot of side steps missions like blowing a strategic bridge, bounty hunters, and money-schemes that were entertaining, but kinda distracting as the gold plot takes a backseat, most of the first act and second. The movie has a great sweeping widescreen cinematography by Director of photography Tonino Delli Colli. The Cemetery showdown is intense. I love how the movie is shot with all the dramatic extreme close ups to give the audience, a sense of tensed. The movie got tense, due to falling out between Leone and Clint Eastwood, as Eastwood got tired of all the camera shooting in different angles, sweeping long shots, and extreme close ups. Both never work together again, after this. I can see why Eastwood might had got upset. There is a bit too much artsy in the film, but it's not too bad. Many of Leone's trademarks, hugely influential to modern filmmakers. Unlike A Fistful of Dollars nor For a Few Dollars More, this film had a bigger budget and its shows. Mad props to the people had to build the bridge in the blowing up scene, it had to be filmed and build twice due to the camera being destroy in the first shot. Another to the crew building a cemetery, just for the Sad Hill shootout scene. The money was well-used. I love the Civil War theme. The theme shows how brutal the backdrop, the Civil War was during that time and how absurd it was. The dubbing on my version was really good. Love the Curse Cut Beep. Ennio Morricone composed the soundtrack. The main theme is turned into one for each protagonist: The Good's has a whistle, The Bad's an ocarina, and The Ugly's screamed. It works so well. 'Story of a soldier' is beautiful. It's eerily in a way, since it play during the torture scene. I also love the score, Ecstasy of Gold. It's haunting at the beginning, it draws you in, slowly. Then it smacks you in the face like a ton of bricks and voila! Depending on what version, you're watching this movie. It can take from 161 min to 186 min. The 186 minute is dubbed. If you find the 2002 extended, it's in English, but cut to 179 min. Then you have an old copy, like the 1984's version, its 142, but its cut as hell. In my opinion, just get the 2004 DVD. Tons of special features on the behind the scene production, documentaries, and additional footages like too badly damaged film negative. All of them are worth the price of 2004 DVD. Overall: One of the best cinematic film. Worth watching if haven't yet saw.
2014-04-22
Sergio Leone's most visionary film...
Sergio Leone is arguably the most visionary director of all time. They say that before he even had a written script he could picture exactly what was to be on screen and the camera's direction in leading his characters. It was Sergio's World - an alternate place in an alternate time that he was free to control. He controlled the audience and his story like no other director.

To me, his best film was the one that was on many critics' ten worst films of 1984 list: "Once Upon a Time in America." I love the finished director's cut, the cut of the film Sergio Leone himself wanted and pictured in his mind while filming the movie. Unfortunately, the editor of the film cut everything into a two-hour picture and messed up the timeline for the theatrical release in 1984 - the result was a disastrous motion picture that now, with the director's cut, stands as one of the best of all time. James Woods once said that one of the critics who named it the worst film of 1984 later named it the best film of the decade.

"Once Upon a Time in America" was Sergio's dream project, one that took him ten years to get on the big screen and ultimately killed him by sucking the life out of him, but "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" (1967) was undoubtably his most visual film. The extreme close-ups, the great way he lets the audience see nothing but what he wants - as far as he saw it, the audience should not wonder what is off-screen; whatever is within the frames is all there is. Compared to "Once Upon a Time" it seems a bit more corny and unrealistic - but it is a spaghetti western, and that is simply the point. It stands above the rest as the best spaghetti western of them all.

Leone is best remembered for his extreme close-ups. Director Quentin Tarantino once said, among many other things about Leone, his role model, that when he started out he knew not many camera directions, so when he wanted an extreme close-up in a film he'd shout, "I want a Sergio Leone on this guy!" Quentin Tarantino has such a respect for Leone that he even suggested the title "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" to director Robert Rodriguez, the title, of course, a derivation on "Once Upon a Time in the West" and "Once Upon a Time in America," both films of Sergio Leone.

"The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," a.k.a. "Buono, il bruto, il cattivo, il," is the final film in the Dollars Trilogy - "A Fistful of Dollars," "For a Few Dollars More," and, of course, "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly." I have yet to see this film's predecessors, but I doubt they are much better than this film. It isn't really about anything per se - it's a showcase of art and camera techniques. It is a showcase for Sergio Leone and a great one at that. I have no real care about the themes or outcomes - I simply enjoy being controlled by a masterful director such as Leone. When there's a director who can literally push in and give the audience specifically what he wants them to see, without the audience feeling cheated, you know you have a great director, because there's a fine line between a selfish director and a visionary director. Leone has a bit of both, so indistinct that it is hard to notice. The same thing was done in Carol Reed's "The Third Man" (1949), and the same is done here. And it is pulled off without any objections from the audience.

Clint Eastwood is The Good - he rides around the desert kidnapping criminals, giving them to the authorities and claiming reward money, and then freeing the criminals before they are to be hanged. He meets Tuco (Eli Wallach), a.k.a. The Ugly, and does his routine - but The Ugly fights back and, ultimately, kidnaps good ol' Clint, taking him into the desert and practically torturing him in the heat.

Then The Good overhears where a stash of gold is hidden from a dying man. The Ugly wants the gold so much that he nurses The Good back to health so that they can go off on a wild goose chase and search for the treasure. But there is already another man searching for the treasure - Angel Eyes, a.k.a. The Bad (Lee Van Cleef), a man whose skills at gunfighting match those of The Good, a true marksman if ever there was such a thing.

There's a terrific scene towards the end of "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," where three men have found the gold buried in a graveyard. At exactly the same time. They each have guns pointed at each other. They could all pull their triggers and die, or kill one of the three and the two could then take the money and split it. Leone zooms in with his extreme close-ups and truly gives the audience a sense of paranoia, a sense of what it would feel like in a circumstance such as that. Sergio Leone is a great director, perhaps the most visionary of all time, and now that his films are turning up again with their intended running times, the realization strikes and sinks in.

He's an even better director than we thought he was.

5/5 stars -

John Ulmer
2003-10-03
Leone overcooks his spaghetti.
'The Good' is sharp-shooter Blondie (Clint Eastwood), although how someone who runs a bounty racket, betrays his friend, and shoots numerous people dead can be deemed good is beyond me. Bandit Tuco (Eli Wallach) is 'The Ugly', which I think is a little unfair to the bloke: he's no George Clooney, but he's not Quasimodo either. That leaves cold-hearted killer Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef) as 'The Bad', which he most definitely is, even going so far as to kill a child in order to achieve his goals. After Blondie and Tuco chance upon a dying Confederate soldier who reveals to them the whereabouts of a fortune in gold, the pair come to the attention of Angel Eyes, who will do anything to lay his hands on the treasure.

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, the third film in Sergio Leone's Dollars trilogy, is an epic spaghetti western that benefits from iconic central characters, an undeniable sense of cool, and, of course, that classic Ennio Morricone soundtrack (Waaawawah, waa waa waa!). Where the film doesn't fare quite so well is in the pacing and storytelling, the basic plot—three guys go in search of hidden treasure—stretched painfully thin, particularly in the Extended Cut, which clocks in at approximately three hours. The expansive historical backdrop—the American Civil War—frequently detracts from the flow of the story and Leone has a tendency to labour a little too much over his style, lingering on his characters for an eternity and repeating similar shots ad nasueum, all of which causes scenes to drag. Fortunately, some nice touches of humour and a couple of neat plot twists help to make matters a little easier to digest.

6/10. Not quite as hard-going as Once Upon A Time In The West, but not a patch on the earlier Dollars movies, or indeed, Leone's underrated A Fistful of Dynamite.
2015-05-28
Cinematic brilliance.
A big, bravado, bold and exquisite film for its time, Sergio Leone's "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" remains one of the most seminal, influential, and exciting films of all time. With its superb cast, its beautiful and wide scenery, and its superior action sequences, this film is a masterpiece. A picture that embodies the perfect personification of masculinity. A true man's picture, and one that will stand tall among most movies today.

The simple tale of how three gunslingers form an unlikely alliance of hate, in order to find $200,000 (that's $6 million by today's standards) worth of stolen gold, in a country that is ravaged by war, is elegantly told by the maestro of westerns, Sergio Leone. For its time, Spaghetti Westerns were not considered genuine art, but rather, entertainment instead. Sergio Leone is probably the only director who is smart enough to make his film compelling to mainstream and critical audiences alike. His direction is smart and strong, and you see how well his direction is as per the amount of manpower and creativity in handling the action sequences. The action sequences are raw, crisp, grand, explosive, and taut. Especially the Standoff at the end. Leone should probably be awarded a Nobel Prize for that scene alone. Leone is probably why westerns are popular among the youth of the '60s, hell, he probably influenced would be filmmakers at the time. I know of one who was particularly influenced by Leone's direction - Quentin Tarantino himself said that this film is the best-directed film of all time. And yes, although the film may be long, there's not a scene that goes by that you'll say boring.

Clint Eastwood - The Good. The legendary Man With No Name. His character perfectly embodies with the true meaning of masculinity. As per in his previous films, he plays a mysterious gunslinger, one with a deadly aim and a strong sense of honor and pride. He is the perfect hero, and this film stands out as one of Clint's, if not his, best film ever.

Lee Van Cleef - The Bad. Here, instead of the fatherly Doug Mortimer in the previous "For A Few Dollars More", we get the stone-cold assassin Angel Eyes. Van Cleef plays him chillingly to the bone. He is wicked, he is ruthless, he is cruel. He would kill anyone, be it his targets or even his own client.

Eli Wallach - The Ugly. He is Tuco, a criminal on the loose. He is the most interesting character in the film, as we see the ugly side of man through him. He is two-faced, slimy, arrogant, and hate-able. But that what makes his character great. There is no substitution for Wallach, he will always be Tuco no matter what.

The cinematography is absolutely beautiful. We get to see the backdrop of the glorious Wild West and the battlefields of war in all its unfaded glory. Even the cemetery scene is filmed extremely well. The music - that's another thing. The music, is masterful, so sublime, so grandiose, and so haunting. It's mesmerizing, really, to hear the great Ennio Morricone's score while looking at the actions of people, it perfectly matches the film. Not forgetting to mention the iconic and haunting theme song that's embodied itself in popular culture even until today.

So, yes, this is truly cinematic brilliance. If you want to see the film in all it's glory, I reckon you readers get the extended cut DVD of the film. It's Leone's true version of this film, and it would do you some good to see his true film, not to mention the remastered picture and 5.1 sound so that you can hear the gunshots and explosions in all its fury. Make no mistake readers, this film is one of the most iconic movies ever made, and it can be proud of its status as "Greatest Western Ever Made". Now if only movies like these were made today as well...

Overall rating: 10/10

Delton
2008-09-26
What got Quentin Tarantino so damn excited...
One of the original Leone "Italian Westerns" that quickened the pulse of a young Quentin Tarantino.

Sometimes I think I am living in a time warp. I watched all the Leone films in theatres in real time and was mesmerized, gob-smacked, and exhilarated. Now in the far future (2016) I watch QT do his knock-offs, and the young audiences (who have never seen the originals) think his are the originals, and everything else the knockoffs.

(Reminds me of the Old King Cole nursery rhyme -- "pulled out a plum and said What a Good Boy Am I" -- another reference lost on those living the age of portable devices.)

For those who actually care about the history of film:

* Leone invented a brand new genre called the Italian western. His first, Fistful of Dollars, recycled a Japanese story (Yojimbo), recycled an American ex-pat whose Hollywood career was officially over (Eastwood) and introduced one of the greatest music composers of the modern film era, Ennio Morricone.

* next came For a Few Dollars More, an original story, which locked into film history Leone's trademark use of closeups and sound editing, and brought out of mothballs Lee Van Cleef, one of the greatest "faces" in the history of the western. ("Angel Eyes" in this one.)

* with two international hits under his belt, Leone aimed for the stars and created this movie which marks his legacy. While simultaneously continuing the tradition he started, and using the two stars from his second film, he gave Eli Wallach (an A-list star from the 1950s) the role of his career. Wait there is more. He set the story against the backdrop of the Civil War and manged to make the transitions seamless and brutally compelling. it is simultaneously a violent film and an anti-war film at the same time! (The only film of Leone's that may compete with this one is Once Upon a Time in America, also reviewed by this writer on the IMDb).

By modern standards the film is overlong and, had it been produced in America (as was indeed the case with Upon a Time in America), the "suits" would have butchered it down to 100 minutes. Luckily for the rest of us, this was an international release, cut-proof, and survives very nicely to the present day in its original form.

QT was a young lad when these films appeared but the impact is clear. He used Morricone's music in Kill Bill (his best film in my view) and in my view The Hateful Eight tries to emulate the power of Leone but falls somewhat short.

For you youngsters out there, I recommend these films as some of the most entertaining efforts ever set to film, period. Imitated but not duplicated.

Astonishing, mind-blowing, unforgettable.
2016-09-09
Words cannot describe the enormity of this film.
There are certain things in life that are unexplainable and incomprehensible in their magnitude. These exalted anomalies include - in no particular order - Revolver, Guernica, The Sistine Chapel, The Ninth Symphony, The Waste Land, Macbeth and then there is this.

This movie expresses a gamut of emotions; every new scene shows a side of a character that one thought was unimaginable; the acting is nothing less than breathtaking and the use of sound and music is unprecedented.

I don't often make bold, sweeping statements, but here goes: this movie could not have been made any better in any regard possible.

Tarantino was quoted as saying that this movie is the best directed movie of all time; who am I to disagree with him? 10/10 without a shadow of a doubt.

P.S. I would have given it ten even if it were based on the Standoff alone.
2009-04-04
"Best climax" i have ever seen.
This is the film which made an effect on me when i watched this movie. What a wonderful cinematography, i think they made a good effort to do such a cinematography. When tuco and Blondie plant the bomb in the bridge i thought the blasting scene will not be realistic, but shockingly the blast was very realistic and i wondered that how would have they did that scene, really extraordinary. The ultimate scene in the movie is, when tuco,"who was eager to know the name of the cemetery from bill Carson, will kick Blondie when he was lying beside bill, but when bill dies and Blondie says that he knows the name of the cemetery, tuco suddenly cares for Blondie. This film has an excellent duologue's by making to understand the viewer indirectly. I think this movie has a best climax than any other movie. Adios..........
2007-05-16
"If you're gonna shoot, shoot; don't talk."
I'm going to start this review by saying this: there is not western that can compare to this, hell, there may not even be any movie that can compare to this. Only a handful come to my mind, and it's a very small handful at that.

Sergio Leone's classic western provides the perfect ensemble of cinematography, direction, acting, story, and last, but not least, music. Leone's film about three greedy men in the search for 500,000 in gold exemplifies the dirty west. This is not your typical American western, where the sun-drenched west is romanticized. No, it's dirty and rough, just like the west was. If anyone wanted to watch the film that is the antithesis the "chick-flick," I would recommend The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

Clint Eastwood reprises his iconic Man With No Name in this final film in the Dollars Trilogy. Lee Van Cleef returns from A Few Dollars More; however, he plays a different (much different) character. The actor who steals the show has to be Eli Wallach. Wallach, a western veteran, plays Tuco with great viciousness and humor, making him likable and unlikeable at the same time; he truly is "ugly." Leone and his cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli pack the film with great shots of the west, from the tired sands of the desert, to the endless graves of a cemetery (which was actually located in Spain). Ennio Morricone combines Colli's lush cinematography with the greatest score ever put onto film. From the easily recognizable theme, to the sad Story of a Soldier, to the excitement of Ecstacy of Gold, this soundtrack has it all.

What more can I say? If you haven't seen The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, see it now! I can not press you more. This is one of those films that could be considered perfect, or the closest to perfection. A classic that shall never be forgotten; a classic that shall always be admired.
2006-07-07
Write descriptive essay about The Good, the Bad and the Ugly movie 1966, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly movie essay, literary essay The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly essay writing, narrative essay, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 500 word essay, argumentative essay The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.
×