Write descriptive essay about Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope movie 1977, write an essay of at least 500 words on Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, 5 paragraph essay on Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, definition essay, descriptive essay, dichotomy essay.
Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope
Year:
1977
Country:
USA
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi
IMDB rating:
8.7
Director:
George Lucas
Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker
Harrison Ford as Han Solo
Carrie Fisher as Princess Lea
Peter Cushing as Governor Tarkin
Alec Guinness as Obi-Wan Kenobi
Kenny Baker as R2-D2
Peter Mayhew as Chewbacca
David Prowse as Darth Vader
James Earl Jones as Darth Vader
Phil Brown as Uncle Owen
Shelagh Fraser as Aunt Beru
Jack Purvis as Chief Jawa
Alex McCrindle as General Dodonna
Eddie Byrne as General Willard
Drewe Henley as Red Leader (as Drewe Hemley)
Storyline: The Imperial Forces, under orders from cruel Darth Vader, hold Princess Leia hostage in their efforts to quell the rebellion against the Galactic Empire. Luke Skywalker and Han Solo, captain of the Millennium Falcon, work together with the companionable droid duo R2-D2 and C-3PO to rescue the beautiful princess, help the Rebel Alliance and restore freedom and justice to the Galaxy.
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Reviews
War of the Stars
The one that started it all...

Spunky Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher) is captured by the evil, satanic bastard known as Darth Vader (body of British weight lifting champion David Prowse, also the same man who trained Christopher Reeve for 1978's "Superman - the Movie"; voice of James Earl Jones) and exposed as a traitor to the evil empire that has enslaved the galaxy and is challenged by a heroic Rebellion. Two of Leia's robots, the hapless C-3P0 (Anthony Daniels) and the handy R2-D2 (Kenny Baker) escape the ship and crash land on the desert wasteland planet known as Tatioone. After being captured by Jawas (Hobbit like people who wear cloaks) and traded to a farmer known as Owen Lars, his wife Beru and their nephew Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill, the future voice of the Joker). Luke is a callow youth who would like nothing more than to leave Tatioone and find adventure in the universe, then he stumbles upon a message in R2 from Leia asking for the help of an Obi-Wan Kenobi, AKA: Ben Kenobi (Alec Guinness). Luke doesn't know anyone named Obi-Wan Kenobi but he knows a strange old hermit man named Ben Kenobi but is unaware that Obi-Wan & Ben are the same man. When R2 sneaks off in the night, Luke and 3P0 chase him down in the day and are attacked by Sand People AKA: Tusken Raiders. When the Sand People try to raid Luke's hover-car, they are scared off by Ben Kenobi, who reveals himself to Luke to be Obi-Wan Kenobi and Luke tells him that R2 claims to be his property and has a message for him. Obi-Wan checks out the message and we find out that he was once a great Jedi Knight and that he was a friend of Luke's father, the late Anakin Skywalker, who was also a great Jedi Knight but one who, as far as Luke knows died of mysterious circumstances; actually, according to Obi-Wan, Anakin was murdered by O's former pupil, "a young Jedi named Darth Vader." Luke, however, has yet to discover the horrible truth behind it all... well, Luke is later persuaded to help Obi-Wan and study the way of the Force, which is what gives a Jedi his power (it helps that the Imperial Storm Troopers mutilated his aunt and uncle while he was out). Luke, Obi-Wan and the robots head off to Mos Eisly space port where they join forces with rogue pilot Han Solo (Harrison Ford in the role that made him a star) and his wookie companion Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). Though they're supposed to go the planet of Alderaan, they are intercepted by the Death Star, a giant space station orb that blows planets up real good and was responsible for the destroying Alderaan before our heroes could get there. Once on board the Death Star, our heroes rescue Princess Leia and get into all sorts of hijinx that will change their lives forever.

Obi-Wan is tragically killed in a duel with his former student, Darth Vader. In the rousing finale, Luke, Han and Chewbacca become big time heroes for destroying the Death Star. The adventure, however, is only beginning.

Well acted, great special effects in both the original theatrical version and the over done special edition, the classic "Star Wars" trilogy is a masterpiece that, for better or worse, helped usher in the age of the blockbuster. Well acted all around by Mark, Harry (as in Harrison Ford), Carrie, Alec and Peter Cushing (as the other villain), but Ford steals the show as Han Solo, the great Rapscallion of the Universe.

"You're all clear kid now let's blow this thing and go home!" - Han Solo
2004-06-09
Say what you will
Say what you will about this movie, its legions of fans, its prequels and sequels. No other set of movies is as well-liked by both "geek" and normal cinema lovers than Star Wars. People of all ages, race, and gender enjoy the movie, unlike many other cult-ish sci-fi movies (Star Trek anyone?) This movie has crossed all culture barriers, with characters, lines, and creatures all well known from one set of movies. You have to live under a rock to not know some of the story lines, statements and characters from this film. The funny thing is how some special effects from this movie look BETTER than some effects made in the 2000's (The Rock in Mummy Returns, anyone??) CGI, to someone like me, just can't compete with scale models, puppets, and camera tricks. I highly recommend this movie to the five people in the universe that have not seen it yet. 25 years later, and it is still, and will forever be, a classic. 10 of 10
2005-01-12
The ultimate space adventure!
I don't think there's any denying that Star Wars changed cinema history and deservedly so. At the time of its release, science-fiction was considered a dead genre with the only major films from Hollywood's recent cannon being the work from Stanley Kubrick and cheesy, yet still fun flicks like Logan's Run. Yet, no other futuristic movie wowed more than George Lucas's space opera. From that infamous opening scroll, featuring that amazing heart-pumping score, to the end credits, people were gripped and hoping their heroes that had grown to know those two previous hours could come out alive. While, George Lucas did give his Jedi knights more adventures, I don't think any of those sequels and certainly not the prequels have managed to come close to the original Star Wars that practically defined the baby boom generation. Watching the film again recently, I am still impressed by the awesome power of the movie and the fact that even after thirty years after its release, it gets me more excited than the latest Hollywood blockbuster. Sorry, Michael Bay, but you're no George Lucas, that's for certain.

After two droids crash-land on the desert planet of Tatooine, they are immediately captured and sold to a young farm boy called Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), who desperately wants to leave the rock he lives on with his aunt and uncle. While fixing one of the droids, he finds a message from Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher), requesting the help of Obi-Wan Kenobi (Alec Guiness). Luke finds Kenobi, a hermit living in the mountains, who tells Luke of his family history. His father was a Jedi knight, killed by the evil Darth Vader and now Kenobi decides it is time to teach him the way of the Force. After Luke finds his family's home destroyed by stormtroopers looking for the two droids, they decide to find their way to another planet. They enlist the help of space pirate Han Solo (Harrison Ford), who decides to give them a lift. On the way, they find the Death Star, a giant space station run by Darth Vader, with the ability to destroy any planet of the solar system. Now, they must enter the Death Star, find and rescue the Princess and destroy the station before it produces anymore harm.

George Lucas has been criticised for his so-called lack of direction and screen writing abilities, but I don't think most people can deny that Star Wars packs a mean punch in terms of solid entertainment. While Star Wars is playing, all eyes are on the screen savouring every delicious moment, whether it be a fantastic lightsaber duel or a quiet scene between Luke and Obi-Wan. The visual effects (including those in the special editions) are seriously some of the best in motion picture history as they manage to make the viewer believe they're in space, surrounded by various creatures and flying ships. Lucas has gotten a lot of negative criticism for the fact that he believes that the updated version of Star Wars is the ultimate way to see the film, but I don't mind. The special effects are better and they certainly do add to the experience. Greedo shooting first? It's such a quick, minor scene that goes by at such a fast rate, that I don't really mind. I understand where the die-hard fans are coming from, but for the casual viewer, it's practically nothing. Adding to the impressive technical delight of Star Wars as well is John Williams's magnificent score, the best in any Hollywood film. I seriously don't think the film would be as highly regarded as it is, if it wasn't for the fantastic music. I seriously would probably enjoy the film even less without it.

Yet, I think the lasting appeal of Star Wars has to be the characters. Every child growing up wants to be like Luke Skywalker, the young Jedi who just wants to save the universe from possible destruction. Meanwhile, the older folks in the audience have the wise Obi-Wan Kenobi to relate and as Yoda shows in the other five films, that old age does not remove one of their abilities. Han Solo represents the coolness of Star Wars and Harrison Ford plays him with enough spunk and gusto to warrant what might be a minor character as a personal favourite of mine. And then, there's Darth Vader, the most famous character and the most chilling villain of the 20th century. James Earl Jones will always be connected with with this constantly breathing menace with a past of many hidden secrets. Even the stormtroopers tremble in his wake, for fear that he will force-choke them to death. With thrilling action, impressive visuals, lovable and both frightening characters and a world full of fascination and adventure, it's hard to go wrong with Star Wars, the epic journey of our hearts and inner wants.
2007-07-05
game changer, but the saga peaked at the start
There is no denying that this film was the start of something big, and you cannot take away from it the fact that it changed the face of the sci-fi genre, maybe even the whole film industry, in to what it is today. For its time, the effects, story, characters and detail in this film are are beyond exemplary. Most action and sci-fi films aim to be compared to star wars, a feat that is rare and, in my opinion, has only been achieved by Terminator 1 and 2, the lord of the rings trilogy and marvels: the avengers.

A new hope works brilliantly as a first chapter to a saga, however, I feel that it works better as a stand alone film. Unlike many films that are a 'first part', it has a beginning, middle and end, tells everything that needs to be told and leaves the characters in a satisfying place. I feel that having seen the prequels does not diminish anything about this film like it does to episodes five and six.

The only problem that I have is that the original theatrical release doesn't really exist anymore, you can only really get the version that has been tinkered with by Lucas to put needless CGI extras in. This is the original and best of the star wars saga, however i do feel that many people see this through rose tinted glasses and will not see any faults in any of the three original films, even though they are happy to say that the three prequels do not exist as far as they are concerned. Awesome film, great legacy, and now that Disney has the rights away from Lucas, a great future too.
2013-11-21
A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.... was the greatest movie of all time.
Star Wars is the God of all movies. It is the greatest film to have ever been made, bar none. Nothing can be compared to it, nor should it be. It is definitive to our world, our society. It changed the way movies were made: for the better.

In the 1970s, there was little unknown director named George Lucas. Little did he know (dispite a nightmarish shoot), that his galactic space opera would literally change the way people lived, worked, played and thought. The secret behind his success? His imagination.

The script, the characters, the events, the locations, the humour, the opening, the ending... all perfect.

Of course, it's not the most well-shot movie of all time, but there's no denying that nobody actually cares. Star Wars has become a cult and a religion, and earned it's place in my heart as the greatest film to have ever been made...

...Millions will agree.

Whatever I say cannot reach the real truth behind Star Wars: just watch it and you'll know exactly what I mean.

The force will be with us, always.

Overall: A definitive masterpiece. Will never be forgotten, and will remain in the hearts of young and old for generations. Perfect. (10/10)
2005-05-26
The Best of Sci-Fi Times,the Worst of sf Times
Though now known as "Episode IV-A New Hope," for many of us, namely those of us who first saw this exhilarating entertainment in theaters back in '77, this will always be the first "Star Wars." We will always think of it as just "Star Wars" - plain & simple, no pretensions, no aspirations to deep film-making or high art. This is where we first met them all: Luke, Han Solo, Princess Leia, Obi-Wan Kenobi (old 'Ben'), Chewbacca, the 2 robots C3PO & R2D2 and, of course, Darth Vader. They were instant pop culture icons; you got the sense you'd seen them before somewhere, but were sure this wasn't possible. But they'd been there before in our minds. We'd read about them constantly in science fiction novels and short stories - tales of outer space civilizations, of spaceships zooming through asteroid belts, of exotic-looking aliens hanging around space ports. We'd dream about them at night and try to imagine ourselves in their midst; up until then, we could only imagine such things - there were no projected images to realize such dreams. "Forbidden Planet" from 1956 came close, and then there were the "Star Trek" and "Lost in Space" TV series, both hampered by dime store budgets and cheesy sets. We ate 'em up since there was nothing else. Then Lucas made it real.

I remember when I first got wind of the upcoming movie, to open in May of 1977, I think. I saw the first publicized poster and bought the novel adaptation. On the poster, a young man stood with some light sword raised, a princess at his feet, numerous spaceships flying all over the place. I was in my mid-teens and felt the first pulse of building excitement as I realized all those fantastic tales I'd been reading the past few years were going to come alive on the big screen for me. It didn't disappoint. Luke Skywalker, who stood in for all the boys pretending to be on a galactic adventure, gets swept away from his mundane desert home smack dab into the middle of an honest-to-gosh galaxy-wide civil war! The strength of the narrative is / was amazing. There are no slow spots and you can't wait for the next scene during the entire experience; and, experience is the better description for it, rather than just 'movie.' You can't wait, for example, for the moment when Luke actually meets the princess; what will happen then? It's a textbook case of an exciting narrative and what I believe makes this superior to all the sequels (knowing that many feel "The Empire Strikes Back" is superior - I must disagree).

The one character you really can't wait to see again is the ominous Vader, naturally. The instant he steps into view during the first few minutes of the story, you just know this is the ultimate villain. This is the baddest of the bad, the coolest of the cool, the supreme uber-evildoer of the entire galaxy. You just know it by his stance, by his attitude, and by the electric chill that runs through your frail form as he steps down the corridor, moving into the annals of film history with one fell swoop. You can't wait to see what he does next, what nefarious action will send someone or some planet to its doom. Sure, he seems under the control of Tarkin (Cushing) here and later, the Emperor, but you just know he's simply biding his time until he takes over the whole damn universe. There is no precedent for Vader, and nothing close to him after. He's at his best here where there's still much mystery attached to his dark frightful form, a minion of Satan and Nazi stormtroopers all rolled into one.

This was also the movie-experience which catapulted Harrison Ford (Solo) into superstardom. He seems almost childish here, not really straining to create a character, and it's this flip charm that makes it work, against all odds. He really does appear to have stepped out of the pages of some juvenile space opera, laser guns blazing, all snide remarks and foolhardy bravado. But he also becomes the older brother figure to Luke, who cannot carry the story by himself. Hamill, whose movie career began & ended with Luke, epitomizes the center of destiny for a galaxy. Both humble and arrogant, he's perfect in the role. Fisher's main surprise is that she's not all sugar and sweet as one would expect of a princess. These three characters evolved in the next two films, but they were always at their best here, icons given life for a short period - but also forever in film. The same could be said for Alec Guinness as Kenobi, a first class act all the way. You almost believe this elderly warrior could topple an empire, given enough time. Unless he runs into Vader...
2005-12-25
One for the history books!
This movie, along with the whole original trilogy, just blows me away! It truly has all the elements a good story needs. The characters have suction cups all over them that glue them to your memory, because they're just so great! The story revolves around young Luke Skywalker, a farm boy who wants more adventure in his life. Adventure finally arrives to him in the form of two droids, sent by Princess Leia, a beautiful woman begging someone named Obi-Wan Kenobi for help. Leia is a huge part of Rebel Alliance, a group of people determined to stop the Empire's reign of terror and evil. When Luke meets up with Obi-Wan, they set out to deliver plans inside the droid to Leia's father, plans that can stop the most destructive weapon ever from destroying any planet that stands up for good. Teaming up with a cocky pilot who is more caring than he lets on named Han Solo and his CoPilot Chewbacca (big dog/ape/bigfoot like creature) the heroes are thrust into adventure beyond Luke's wildest dreams, complete with a heroine, henchmen, space ships, battles and the most menacing villain a movie has ever seen.

Star Wars is a movie you won't forget soon after watching it. It's full of excitement, humor, romance (more so in the ESB, the sequel), great dialogue danger, and a never tiresome fight between good and evil. I recommend the trilogy to anyone and everyone who hasn't seen it (that would be...3 people...don't worry though, I'm a pretty newly converted fan too!) Han Solo rocks! May the force be with you all. 10/10
2005-04-18
This film holds up
When I was 12, I went to see Star Wars in the theater 32 times. This is the film that made me want to make films. Star wars is a classic in my mind, full of fun, and campy lines.. The story is about a farm boy named Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) who discovers that the used robot recently purchased by his family plays back a message from one Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher), begging for help from Obi-Wan Kenobi. Luke asks his father's friend Ben Kenobi (Alec Guinness) about this, and he discovers that Ben and Obi-Wan are one and the same. Kenobi tells Luke of the battle of the rebels against the ruling Empire and the spiritual energy called "The Force." Soon Luke, Kenobi, and a mercenary named Han Solo (Harrison Ford) join forces to rescue Princess Leia from the Empire's mammoth warship, the Death Star, controlled by evil genius Darth Vader (David Prowse, with the voice of James Earl Jones).
2013-10-26
Classic bit of fun sci-fi – a space western!
The Republic has fallen and the Empire rules the galaxy as a dictatorship, seeking to destroy dissenting voices. The Empire's ultimate weapon, the Death Star, is fully on line and capable of destroying whole systems. The Jedi have been destroyed, save a few living in hiding, unable to compete with the force of the Empire. However Princess Leia has the plans showing a weakness within the Death Star. Before she is captured by Darth Vader she gives them to droids C3PO and R2D2 and they escape. When they land on a nearby planet they find Luke Skywalker and set out to find the owner of the droids Obi Wan Kenobi, or Old Ben Kenobi. Obi Wan begins to train Luke in the way of the force as they try to get the information to the Rebellion before the Death Star can be used at full power.

It's not a brilliant piece of filmmaking – lets be honest, Lucas isn't the Shakespeare of our generation. However what it is, is a good story of good v's evil, a western of goodies v baddies set in space. The story is simple but contains clear characters. The thing that sets it apart is the fun – the sense of wonder for kids but also the enjoyment it brings to adult. The story is good for a sci-fi with a lot of history and back-story clearly set out up front. The action scenes are mostly great – not dry effects but with a real sense of action and excitement too.

This may be the 4th part but it's also our first chapter, it is light and enjoyable but hints that this is only part of an ongoing battle. The way it relates to kids and adults is obvious as it broke records and everyone of a certain age knows about Star Wars! The effects still look good today – in many ways the model work looks better than all digital effects simply because they are `real' and don't just exist within a computer. Sound effects, comedy, music – it's all pitch perfect and sets up the rest of the series really well.

Hamil is ok as Skywalker (`Blonde hair, blue eyes' – Chasing Amy!). He is suitable for a kids film and he does well with his role. However like part 1 has Anakin at his least interesting, part 4 has Luke yet to develop into darker areas. Ford is perfect as Han Solo – he adds character and flair to some dry performances. Alec Guinness adds maturity to the whole film and is so good is Obi Wan that even Ewan McGregor just does an impression rather than recreate the role. Darth Vader is just the right side of silly camp villain, Jones' voice is a perfect fit and he has real menace and power. Bits players such as Chewie, C3PO, R2D2 etc all add comedy in spades.

Overall this film is even better now that we know how it all fits together in Star Wars `history'. But even without all the hype this is a really fun sci-fi that is enjoyable, simple and really good fun to watch if you're in the mood. Having a deeper perspective on it just makes it all the better.
2002-06-30
One of the most popular films of all time, and understandably so
I was never a "Star Wars" guy growing up. I wouldn't say that I was a "Star Trek" guy growing up either ("Doctor Who" was my sci-fi franchise of choice growing up, and still is, even though I'm not a big fan of Russell T. Davies' version of the show), but I would definitely choose my favorite episodes of the original series or "Deep Space 9", "The Wrath of Khan", and "The Undiscovered Country" over any "Star Wars" film. I've seen the original trilogy a couple of times previously, once as a kid, once in my mid-teens, and now I sit down to watch "Star Wars" again, having been inspired by catching half of "The Empire Strikes Back" on TV recently and being enthralled by it.

The first thing that struck me is how great the opening shot is, just after the scrolling text that is. The rest of the movie was pretty much how I remembered it being- a collection of great set-pieces and memorable characters, and a great mythology, but with a story which wasn't nearly as grand and great as "The Empire Strikes Back". Although a point of criticism aimed at "Star Wars" by its (relatively few) detractors is that it doesn't quite match the real feel of a 30's/40's serial, I think that it really does, and not only in the way it is shot and the transitional wipes and all that, but in the writing, the acting, and just about everything else. It has that same sense of adventure, and although this particular film is nowhere near as good as some of my favorite serials, it remains something which very accurately captures the feel of watching one of those, and its popularity (and the popularity of "Raiders of the Lost Ark") is hence quite understandable, as very few of even the big summer blockbusters have the same sensibility and sense of adventure, and well, fun.

Watching "Star Wars", in spite of it not being my favorite of the original trilogy, serves as a reminder of the talent which George Lucas had at one point. I don't think this film is as good as his previous effort, "American Graffiti", which is the greatest 'coming of age' film I've ever seen, and one of the most beautiful films ever made from a visual standpoint, but it's still got spirit and energy which his later efforts just don't. It's quite sad, really.

There's really nothing I can say that hasn't been said already (which is true, certainly of many popular films, but this is freakin' "Star Wars", so trust me, I have NOTHING to add to what has already been said). There are "Star Wars" devotees who swear it is the greatest of the trilogy and one of the best movies ever made, there are detractors who think it's cheesy nonsense, and then there are others like me who like it quite a bit, but aren't sure where all the extravagant praise comes from. "The Empire Strikes Back"... Well, that's a whole other story.

8/10
2008-11-04
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