Write descriptive essay about Diamonds Are Forever movie 1971, write an essay of at least 500 words on Diamonds Are Forever, 5 paragraph essay on Diamonds Are Forever, definition essay, descriptive essay, dichotomy essay.
Diamonds Are Forever
Year:
1971
Country:
USA, UK
Genre:
Crime, Thriller, Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi, Comedy
IMDB rating:
6.7
Director:
Guy Hamilton
Sean Connery as James Bond
Jill St. John as Tiffany Case
Charles Gray as Ernst Stavro Blofeld
Lana Wood as Plenty O'Toole
Jimmy Dean as Willard Whyte
Bruce Cabot as Albert R. 'Bert' Saxby
Putter Smith as Mr. Kidd
Bruce Glover as Mr. Wint
Norman Burton as Felix Leiter
Joseph Fürst as Dr. Metz
Desmond Llewelyn as Major Boothroyd
Leonard Barr as Shady Tree
Lois Maxwell as Miss Moneypenny
Storyline: James Bond's mission is to find out who has been smuggling diamonds, which are not re-appearing. He adopts another identity in the form of Peter Franks. He joins up with Tiffany Case, and acts as if he is smuggling the diamonds, but everyone is hungry for these diamonds. He also has to avoid Mr. Wint and Mr. Kidd, the dangerous couple who do not leave anyone in their way. Ernst Stavro Blofeld isn't out of the question. He may have changed his looks, but is he linked with the heist? And if he is, can Bond finally defeat his ultimate enemy. Written by simon
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Reviews
Sean Connery returns as Vegas Bond
Sean Connery returns and kills Blofeld in the first 10 minutes. Then he's put onto the case of missing South African diamonds. He assumes the identity of diamond smuggler Peter Franks. But his investigation leads him to Las Vegas and an unexpected nemesis.

This is probably one of the weaker Bond movie. It is just not exotic to be stuck in Vegas for so long. It's the difference between real locations and Hollywood sets. Vegas could be fun, but it's not exotic. Although, it is interesting to see the old style Vegas before the modern built-up.

The best new names have to be Bambi and Thumper. They are amazingly hot bodyguards. And then we got sexy Jill St. John firing her gun in a bikini. No matter what happens, a Bond movie will usually have great Bond girls.

There is more sly humor than ever before. There are the sarcastic killer pair Mr Kidd and Mr Wint with their dead pan humor. The sexual innuendos are thicker than ever. There is a bad Roger Moore quality to this Bond movie. Only Moore knows how to do it with a nudge and a wink. The moon rover chase is one of the stupidest thing ever. And there isn't anything superior in any of the designs either. A tiny oil platform isn't that impressive for an evil hideout.
2013-12-17
Sophisticated, stylish romp
Many people are apparently put off by this Bond film. Sure, Sean Connery is older, you see Blofeld (this time with a head of hair) and the series seemed a tad out of place in 1971, when the anti-war movement was running strong.

This movie is not Goldfinger, despite the presence of Guy Hamilton at the helm and Shirley Bassey as the singer of the title theme. What this movie is is a stylish romp that seems to bear some nod to the Batman TV series in terms of style. In some other respects, this movie plays almost like an Anglicized version of "The FBI," or like "The Persuaders."

And that is not at all bad!

The original femme fatale of the 1966 Batman series, Jill St. John, is the female lead here, and is fun to watch. She shows a lot of spirit in the role. Charles Grey is fun to watch as Blofeld, because he brings a real wit to the role. The dialogue is definitely sophisticated, and it is a very stylish production that I think holds up well. And Lana Wood does a fine job here, too! (Oh, and I met her in Detroit in May 2009; sweet lady!!)

This movie is also more daring in terms of sex than any other Bond: The public display of affection the thugs Wint and Kidd show, as well as the topless scene of Lana Wood's character.

Gadgets don't seem to dominate this outing. It's no 1960s Connery film (the lead actor's older), nor a 1970s Moore outing (more serious). This movie is sandwiched between the two eras, and it rightly should be taken on its own terms. Which means, I think it is one of the most enjoyable Bond films made--a sophisticated, stylish romp. It is, in my view, a most enjoyable Bond (and my personal favourite)!
2003-07-26
'She's very pretty...for a lady!'
In my opinion this is probably the worst James Bond film - although it's still watchable. For starters, Sir Sean Connery just looks a bit past it - his paunch and toupee are really starting to look obvious, and he just looks out of place in the tacky Las Vegas locations. Bond is at home wearing a dinner jacket in a casino - but not a casino like 'Circus Circus' populated by midwestern holidaymakers! You may as well send Bond to Blackpool!

The faltering plot and the lack of Bond's sense of revenge at Blofeld also leave the whole thing flat.

Good points are the great score and theme song, and I do like Mr Wint and Mr Kidd - of course they're un PC but they're such outrageously over the top old queens that you'd have to be very po-faced to dislike them. Plenty O' Toole is gorgeous but wasted.

Somehow Sir Sean just seems at odd with the slightly camp direction the series was taking, and by the end of the film we can see the way is clear for the best ever James Bond - the master, Mr Roger Moore.
2002-12-19
"Oh, providing the collars and cuffs match..."
Diamonds Are Forever is often described as a Roger Moore film starring Sean Connery, but it goes even farther than that. Whereas Moore ushered in ironic/silly codings, Diamonds contains the most overtly camp humour the series ever indulged in. The film also contains the most amount of nudity, and arguably the rudest jokes of the franchise. The title quote is Connery's quip to a girl with ever-changing wigs, while later we get the immortal "I'm afraid you've caught me with more than my hands up."

There's the sense of the odd, or uneasy, about this one all the way through. From the theme title (and what a great song!) precipitated by a cat's cry to the homosexual henchmen Mr.Wynt and Mr. Kidd. Their unnerving air is not the result of their gay, slightly homophobic, portrayal, but in Putter Smith's performance as Kidd. Not a trained actor, but an accomplished jazz bassist, this off-kilter playing creates an unconscious, unsettling atmosphere.

It's this juxtaposition which compels throughout. Like seeing Britain's top espionage agent doing the childhood "snogging with yourself" routine then smashing a man's head through a window just seconds later. It's a superficially lightweight film, but with a nasty, almost bitter undercurrent. Connery's obvious resistance to the role actually serves it well here, given that this is the first post-wife Bond movie. Bernard Lee plays an unusually terse M to complement this abrasive 007. Such a starch display cuts through the smug underpinnings of the character and makes the cheesy one-liners more palatable. He looks older than in any of his other Bond films - Never Say Never Again included – but this also fits his anguished, bereaved state. In line with this most misogynistic of Bond pictures, Jill St. John's character development passes from intelligent, through to devious and down into simpering bimbo.

Incidental music is a bit disattached, and often feels like it belongs to another film. It works against, rather than with, the picture it's there to support. Yet although not quite the best of the series, this and the following Live and Let Die are the most distinctive in look, feel and style. They're light, pacy, poppish takes on the format, full of comicbook verve and wit. Guy Hamilton's direction is also very good; making the most of the LA location with use of expansive aerial shots.

The plot seems fairly complex, though maybe that's because it's underdeveloped and submerged beneath slightly irrelevant setpieces. I had to smile at the line "Get him off that machine, that isn't a toy" as Sean boards the moonbuggy. I remember after the film it became one, a primary-coloured Dinky version with a spinning radar. Brings back memories, that.

Blofeld, who has now taken up cloning and cross-dressing, is played here by Charles Gray. Although at the time it was four years before he would become the criminologist in The Rocky Horror Picture Show, the two are now inseparable, in my mind at least. As if this wasn't enough high camp to go round, there's also Connery being demolished by Bambi and Thumper, a couple of sadistic female gymnasts.

If something about this quirky, offbeat Bond (and some sources list it as the seventh least successful in terms of gross) doesn't quite gel, then it greatly improves on repeat viewings.
2001-07-26
An Highly Inadequate Finale to the Sean Connery era.
Sean Connery made it clear during the filming of "You Only Live Twice" that he was sick of playing James Bond. After four years, 1.25 million dollars, an agreement to receive one-eighth of the film's gross profit, and a commitment to finance two additional projects of his choice, Connery returned for another spin as the world's deadliest government agent. Sadly, the man who electrified the world for six years returned for a problematic movie that at best is a disappointment and at worst a large black stain on his legacy.

Many of the problems that drown "Diamonds Are Forever" show up in the opening minutes. It begins where "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" ends. Bond is on the revenge trail following the murder of his wife. Connery's face remains hidden to raise anticipation, but when it finally appears, my reaction is shock.

At one time he looked like the handsome, debonair ladies man he is supposed to be, but at 41, Connery has outlived the part. He has more wrinkles, his eyes have darkened with age, he is getting fatter, and his hair is grayer. I once watched a clip online of a scene where he is standing next to Q, played by Desmond Llewelyn, who was 56 years old with white hair. I initially mistook him for one of Q's assistants.

"From Russia with Love" displayed Connery at his best. In every possible way, he made the part his own with an authority neither he nor the five actors following him have since been able to equal. This time he was just doing it for the money, and it shows. In "Goldfinger," he said "Bond, James Bond" with focus and cool. Here, it is delivered with unexpressive staccato. When he is ordered to put up his hands, he moves them to the side like a man bored with being bored.

Diamond smuggling out of South Africa has risen over the past two years. Since no smuggled stones have reached the market, the British government fears somebody may be accumulating them in preparation for a market dump. A string of recent murders in South Africa leads them to fear that operations are being shut down, leaving them little time to bust the smugglers. James Bond is sent undercover as smuggler Peter Franks. His mission takes him to the casinos of Las Vegas, where he discovers the involvement of his old enemy, Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Charles Gray).

Gray is another problem evident from the beginning. Blofeld is supposed to be bald, but even if Gray was bald he would not remotely look or sound the part. In "From Russia with Love," Blofeld seemed like a god. Gray is not imposing, and seeing the mighty Blofeld dressing as a transvestite is the worst insult in the series. For the ignominious title of worst Bond villain, Gray loses to Stephen Berkoff from "Octopussy," but barely.

When Bond finally discovers Blofeld, how does he react? He indulges in polite conversation. The movie forgets that Bond is speaking to the man who callously murdered his wife, and that Blofeld is addressing the man who broke his neck.

Another huge minus is the general lack of excitement. It has a good start with an intense elevator fight between Bond and the real Peter Franks. If you see this film, which I strongly discourage, savor that fight, because "Diamonds" becomes pretty anemic afterwards. The remainder lacks intrinsic interest or excitement. Aside from a slick nighttime street chase, the little action that is left looks fake and slow. When Bond is faced with trouble, what does he do? He runs, preferably in a phony moon machine. From start to finish, he does not fire a single bullet. Adding insult is the cheap climax. Six years earlier, this franchise won a visual effects Oscar. Now they are reduced to creating nuclear explosions that look like puffs of smoke. Connery's salary supposedly slashed the special effects budget even though the franchise made over a 400 million dollar profit since "Goldfinger." Two musicians are cast in supporting roles. Imagine "Quantum of Solace" casting Garth Brooks and Wynton Marsalis. Ironically, it is country singer Jimmy Dean who brings the most convincing act to the table. Jill St. John and Lana Wood are wasted as the bimbo and harlot, respectively. Mr. Wint (Bruce Glover) and Mr. Kidd (Putter Smith) are the gay hit men who don't know each other's first names, and the best I can say about them is that they die entertainingly.

"Diamonds Are Forever" marked the beginning of sad decade for Agent 007. Were it not for "The Spy Who Loved Me," the series likely would have died. A movie with shoddy writing, substandard acting, misplaced atmosphere and bad characters cannot succeed. Diamonds slowly decay into other forms of carbon, so they are not truly forever. Neither is Sean Connery.
2008-05-26
Pretty funny last Sean Connery entry.
This is a pretty funny 007 film starring Sean Connery as his last outing as James Bond in the original continuity (not counting the Thunderball remake Never Say Never Again). Bond gets involved in a diamond smuggling investigation in Las Vegas, where he uncovers an extortion plot headed by his number one enemy, Ernst Stavro Blofeld.

Unlike earlier Bond films, you get to see Bond deal more one-on-one with Blofeld. There are more, if I remember, comedy in this entry than earlier films, particularly in that of Bond girl Tiffany Case (Jill St. John). I actually thought Case did a good job in her role; she was very funny and entertaining. There are also plenty of other Bond girls including that of Bambi and Thumper.

Bond did his usual one-liners and Licensed to Kill action in this film, but it was evident that Connery was done with the role. While many Bond films tend to drag on the plot a little, this one was pretty fast-paced and entertaining for me and I thought it closes out the Connery saga pretty well.

Grade B+
2013-10-28
BOND#7: What Doesn't Stay in Vegas? Bond!
MASTER PLAN: steal a lot of diamonds to fashion an orbiting super-duper laser to, guess what, blackmail the world! The pre-credits teaser functions as an epilogue to "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," with Bond hunting his arch-nemesis, Blofeld, in a quick series of scenes throughout the world. The filmmakers tried to recapture the best of "Goldfinger" in this one, using the same director and singer Bassey on the credits again. Ending up with even a pale imitation of the best Bonder is not such a bad thing, but it also points to the lack of originality besetting the series by this time. This one probably breaks the record for unusual types of killings, mostly courtesy of gay assassins Wint & Kidd, who go through a bunch of victims very quickly early on. The odd flavor and juxtaposition (detail of diamond smuggling over surreal liquidations) is an attempt to make Bond edgy & relevant now that the seventies began. The danger with all the attempts to be unusual, whether in regard to deaths or chases, is that it dips into a cutesy atmosphere a bit too far. Those fans fond of the seriousness in the previous film would probably not be amused, since it comes across as a dark parody of the usual spy stuff. That being said, Wint & Kidd, who represent the worst excesses of this film, end up as the highlights. From their very first scene in the desert, where they seem to draw inspiration from a scorpion, these two oddballs have the audience guessing on what they would do next - they are goofy, yes, but also lethal - interesting because they are somewhat original.

Bond's mission, tracking an involved diamond smuggling operation, takes him briefly to Amsterdam, but he ends up in Las Vegas for most of the story. A subplot involves a missing billionaire, obviously patterned after Howard Hughes, who was still living as a recluse at this time. M and, especially Moneypenny, have less screen time in this one, though Q pops up in an amusing scene testing one of his gizmos on some one-armed bandits (Vegas is no match for Q). Though the scenes in Vegas itself are less exotic than those of most Bond films, the film also makes good use of the surrounding desert terrain and there are numerous grand sets, notably a huge futuristic lab building, complete with tests of a fake moon landing, as well as a house built into the rocks. There is a good auto chase on the streets of Vegas, which has the infamous 'two-wheely' by Bond thru an alley. The two weird assassins pop up every now and then; they even have their own theme score, an eerie yet playful little tune. One of them looks very strange (Smith, a jazz musician with no acting experience), while the other (actor Glover, father of Crispin Glover) looks more normal but has very strange inflections to his speech. Every time they show up, a strange tension surfaces for the viewer. Besides Wint & Kidd, other outrageous foes for Bond include Bambi & Thumper, two wild martial arts girls who nearly knock his teeth in. Their scene has a lot of energy and you won't soon forget them. The story is well-paced for the most part, with less of those slow spots that afflicted many of the later Bonders. However, a couple of deleted scenes with the Plenty character makes things a bit confusing for her character arc.

Connery is, of course, several years older since his last Bonder, but he looks pretty much the same as he did in "You Only Live Twice." There may be a hint of grey around the edges and, in his scenes with M, it no longer comes across as 'the old man and the wiseguy kid' repartee, despite their best efforts. But Bond is still the ideal male here and it's still believable that femme fatale Tiffany falls for him by the end. She's a curious mixture of flaky girl and worldly woman, usually flippant in her approach, sort of reflecting the trivial nature of this Bonder, where nothing happening is really of grave import. That's why, when Blofeld's (him again) real plan is revealed, it's a bit out of left field; all of sudden, we see a super laser detonating missiles around the globe and everything has changed into matters of international import. Blofeld, as played by Gray, is more urbane and effeminate than the previous two versions, more attuned to a villain planning world domination, but he's also too civilized, too polite to Bond in the climactic sequence, diffusing his threatening presence. CIA liaison Leiter recalls the non-descript Leiter of "Goldfinger," as well. The climax on that oil rig sea platform in Baja is not very well done, with Blofeld's end especially disappointing (he would not return, except in the teaser of "For Your Eyes Only"). But, the epilogue is excellent. Bond, but not Connery, would return in "Live and Let Die." Bond:8 Villain:7 Femme Fatales:7 Henchmen/women:8 Leiter:6 Fights:8 Stunts/Chases:8 Gadgets:6 Auto:7 Locations:6 Pace:8 overall:7
2007-06-02
Overly Americanised, action-free camp-fest
DAF is one of the weakest, laziest movies in the franchise.

For a start, where is the action? Apart from a good close quarters punch up in a lift, there is hardly any. What remains is lacking in energy and played mainly for laughs. 007 beaten up by two acrobatic women - until he just holds them underwater in a swimming pool. An awful slapstick car-trashing chase in Vegas. And the big finale is anything but. We have a few of Blofled's henchmen fighting a few helicopters. Bond does almost nothing except swing Blofeld's escape pod around with a crane.

Which brings us to another point - this is without doubt the least serious Bond movie ever. It is borderline comedy throughout, clearly influenced by the likes of The Man from UNCLE and the Batman TV show. Blofeld dresses in drag at one stage. Most of the supporting characters are comic relief. The sinister henchmen, Wint and Kidd, would stand out in any other movie due to their extreme black humour, but here they are just wasted. Jill St John's Tiffany Case is amongst the worst Bond girls, silly and helpless.

We even see Q - in Vegas - cheating on a slot machine.

At least Connery is back right? Wrong. He's clearly on set, but equally clearly thinking about his next round of golf. Even his delivery of 'Bond, James Bond' is awful. He isn't helped by some awful costume decisions, including a brown tweed suit, and a pink (!) tie. Connery's huge payout for this film means everything else looks cheaper than before; by the climax you have embarrassing helicopter explosions, clearly animated, that would have been superbly detailed model shots in previous (and later) movies.

There is virtually nothing good to say about Diamonds. The film is so lacking in energy or excitement that only the plot manages to pull it along. It's a series of weird and comedic scenes that hardly feel like a Bond movie in any way, and it's hard to believe this came after On Her Majesty's Sceret Service. The film scrimps so much on the action that you are left watching a bizarre, parallel universe version of Bond where nothing remotely Bond-ish seems to happen. It feels almost like a live-action version of a Saturday morning Bond cartoon, watered down for the kids (Bond never even uses his gun).

Two plus points; Shirey Bassey's theme tune is superbly atmospheric and mysterious. Jill St John is very sexy. That's it. Connery came back, the director of Goldfinger came back, and the result was this farce.
2008-10-05
Not the best Bond movie of Sean Connery
In 1967 Sean Connery quits the role of James Bond. Panic! Producers replace him with Australian born George Lazenby, who makes "On Her Majesty Secret Service". This film does reasonably well at the box office, but not as well as the previous episodes... Furthermore, a big part of the audiences and many critics savage Lazenby's performance, rather pale compared to Connery's Bond portrait. "OHMSS" has been revalued since, but at the time of the release it's perceived like a disappointment.

In '71 producers hire American actor John Gavin for "Diamonds are forever" (DAF), but at the very last minute Sean Connery decides to come back to the role for one time only...

The film is a kind of remake of "Goldfinger" -there is Sean, of course; director Guy Hamilton; Shirley Bassey sings the theme; the story takes place in America; here too we have glamorous elements (diamonds instead of gold).

The movie is funny, Sean looks amused and quite relaxed in traveling between Amsterdam and Las Vegas to investigate about a diamond illegal traffic.

Nevertheless it's the "worst" of his Bonds... It's his less interesting outing as 007. When we think about him as Bond we think about the episodes of the Sixties, when the series was at its beginning. "Diamonds" has not the classical atmosphere of "Goldfinger" and "Thunderball" -the rhythm of DAF is not constant, there are also too many jokes, and a more American humor of the movie spoils the "Britishness" of 007. The first part of the film is boring, the second half has more action -although the final battle scene is not very well done.

Sean is Sean, but here he looks older than his age -curiously he looks fitter and more charming in "Never say never again", an "unofficial" Bond done 12 years later! By the way his presence in this film saves the show completely and a good entertainment is guaranteed.
2005-10-16
Sean Connery returns and goes back out with a bang
After the release of On Her Majesty's Secret Service, most people probably assumed that George Lazenby was officially the new James Bond... they were wrong. Connery returned supposedly one last time to reprise Bond in 'Diamonds Are Forever' which completed the Ernest Blofeld trilogy of the series for those who know what I'm talking about. The film picks up loosely following the events of OHMSS. What are those events one might ask? Watch it and see for yourself. Overall, I really liked Diamonds are Forever. It is on of the first Bond films I saw as a teenager so I guess it holds somewhat of a special place for me. That being said, I may fail to point out possible legit criticisms so for anyone who wonders what those criticisms could be, watch the movie or look for another review. Regardless of what "could" be wrong with Diamonds Are Forever, it definitely holds up well and is very entertaining. The movie on one or two occasions tends to make fun of itself but that really takes nothing away from it. As with the previous installments before and after Thunderball, I recommend this Bond title.
2011-02-26
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